On Liberty

Targeting teenage rapper smacks of prosecutorial abuse


Carol Rose

Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, originally wrote this blog for Boston.com.

An 18-year-old high school student from the Boston suburb of Methuen is facing two decades in prison, charged with "communicating a terrorist threat."The young aspiring rapper, Cameron D’Ambrosio, a/k/a Cammy Dee, reportedly posted the following to his Facebook page on May 1, 2013: "Fuck a Boston bomb wait till u see the shit I do, I'm be famous rapping, and beat every murder charge that comes across me!"

Catching the bad guys, helping the good guys





Carol Rose

Matthew Segal

Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, and Matthew Segal, legal director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, originally co-wrote this guest blog for Boston.com.

At a Friday evening press conference following some of the most tragic and chaotic days in the state’s history, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick made two important announcements: first, he lifted the “stay indoors request,” and second, he called on everyone to remain “vigilant.” Those announcements were important not only because they help people know what to expect from the police, but also because they help us understand our liberties in the face of terror.

Boston shows its strength, resilience and unity


Carol Rose

Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, originally wrote this blog for Boston.com.

In the aftermath of the horrific Boston Marathon bombings, the leaders and people of Boston have proven their patriotic spirit with strength, resilience and unity.

Police step one toke over the line by busting mere pot smokers


Carol Rose

Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, originally wrote this blog for Boston.com.

Common sense scored a victory today when the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled in two cases that sharing a joint does not constitute drug "distribution" under the criminal laws of the Commonwealth.

Marriage equality hasn't made the sky fall


Christopher Ott

Christopher Ott, communications director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, originally wrote this guest blog for Boston.com.

In the lead-up to the marriage cases before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, I talked with friends recently about the arguments that opponents of equality used to make. Still shaking my head in disbelief, even after nearly a decade, I said:

"They basically argued that the sky was going to fall if gay people were just allowed to get married!"